Via Paste magazine, David Tennant reads Shakespeare’s Sonnet 126:

O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power
Dost hold Time’s fickle glass, his sickle, hour;
Who hast by waning grown, and therein showest
Thy lovers withering, as thy sweet self growest.
If Nature, sovereign mistress over wrack,
As thou goest onwards still will pluck thee back,
She keeps thee to this purpose, that her skill
May time disgrace and wretched minutes kill.
Yet fear her, O thou minion of her pleasure!
She may detain, but not still keep, her treasure:
Her audit (though delayed) answered must be,
And her quietus is to render thee.

C…c…can’t talk, drooling.

— Petra

Hey everyone!  What’s your Friday Read?

I’m going to check out Havemercy, the first Dragon Corps book.

NPR Music’s Felix Contreras is reading Akashic’s Mexico City Noir compilation: “I just got back from a trip to Mexico and I loaded my kindle with one of those amazing Akashic noir series, Mexico City Noir. It has a fantastic intro written by my fav crime writer, Mexico’s Paco Ignacio Taibo (PIT).”

Boss Lady Ellen is reading Kicking the Skyabout the immigrant Portuguese community in 1970’s Toronto.

Nicole is reading number9dream, by David Mitchell.

Rose is reading All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr.

And Arts guru Tom Cole says, “When we got word about Peter Matthiessen’s impending demise, I dug out the paperback of Far Tortuga that I bought when it came out.  The opening is an amazing description of a sunrise as it gradually breaks across Grand Cayman Island from East to West.  I’ve just started the novel again.  I read slowly.  You won’t need to send me another one of these emails until the fall.” 

Image via Getty
Today in Book News: The instantly recognizable man with the immaculate white moustache was a novelist, but he was also a journalist, a political agitator and a celebrity with a reach unlike any writer since Mark Twain. When Gabriel Garcia Marquez died Thursday at the age of 87, presidents, authors, actors and pop stars made public statements. Colombia, his native country, declared three days of mourning. 
Also today: Exiled Romanian poet Nina Cassian has died at 89 in New York City, where she’d lived since secret police under the Stalinist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu found her poems mocking the regime.  Hillary Clinton has picked a title for her memoir: Hard Choices, and Gary Shteyngart retires from blurbing.
Read more here.

Image via Getty

Today in Book NewsThe instantly recognizable man with the immaculate white moustache was a novelist, but he was also a journalist, a political agitator and a celebrity with a reach unlike any writer since Mark Twain. When Gabriel Garcia Marquez died Thursday at the age of 87, presidents, authors, actors and pop stars made public statements. Colombia, his native country, declared three days of mourning

Also today: Exiled Romanian poet Nina Cassian has died at 89 in New York City, where she’d lived since secret police under the Stalinist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu found her poems mocking the regime.  Hillary Clinton has picked a title for her memoir: Hard Choices, and Gary Shteyngart retires from blurbing.

Read more here.

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

A little reminder to myself to finish reading Colson Whitehead’s new book, so I can pick an excerpt for next week’s First Read — yeeeeeeaah! And not only will we have an exclusive pre-publication taste of poker, beef jerky and death (well, hopefully not death, but I’m definitely down with beef jerky), I’ll also be doing a Twitter chat with Whitehead on Tuesday morning over at @nprbooks — stay tuned for details!
And in the meantime, check out our coverage of his previous books here.
— Petra

A little reminder to myself to finish reading Colson Whitehead’s new book, so I can pick an excerpt for next week’s First Read — yeeeeeeaah! And not only will we have an exclusive pre-publication taste of poker, beef jerky and death (well, hopefully not death, but I’m definitely down with beef jerky), I’ll also be doing a Twitter chat with Whitehead on Tuesday morning over at @nprbooks — stay tuned for details!

And in the meantime, check out our coverage of his previous books here.

— Petra

Today on Cool Stuff We Get In The Mail

In Once Upon a Playground, Brenda Biondo photographs vintage playground equipment and pairs them with their original catalog listings.

The result is kind of creepy — I would not want to meet any of these jungle gyms alone in a dark alley.

That said, look at that SPACESHIP PLAYGROUND.

-Nicole

Hey, don’t be harshing on metal merry-go-rounds. Those things were so much fun I’m surprised they were EVER allowed.

— Petra

Image via Getty
Today in Book News: At The Atlantic, Alexis Madrigal writes that Amazon’s recommendation algorithm has created an accidental starter kit for drug dealers: “One day, some drug dealer bought a particular digital scale — the AWS-100 — on the retail site, Amazon.com. And then another drug dealer bought the same scale. Then another. Then another. Amazon’s data-tracking software watched what else these people purchased, and now, if you buy the AWS-100 scale, Amazon serves up a quickstart kit for selling drugs.”
Also, Gabriel Garcia Marquez’ health is stable but fragile after a recent hospitalization, E.L. Doctorow wins the 2014 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, and poet Patricia Lockwood wonders whether poetry is work.
Read more here.

Image via Getty

Today in Book NewsAt The Atlantic, Alexis Madrigal writes that Amazon’s recommendation algorithm has created an accidental starter kit for drug dealers: “One day, some drug dealer bought a particular digital scale — the AWS-100 — on the retail site, Amazon.com. And then another drug dealer bought the same scale. Then another. Then another. Amazon’s data-tracking software watched what else these people purchased, and now, if you buy the AWS-100 scale, Amazon serves up a quickstart kit for selling drugs.”

Also, Gabriel Garcia Marquez’ health is stable but fragile after a recent hospitalization, E.L. Doctorow wins the 2014 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, and poet Patricia Lockwood wonders whether poetry is work.

Read more here.

NPR’s Bilal Qureshi explores the Lahore Literary Festival:

"There’s a real thirst for this in this society and that is the great hope for Pakistan," Jalal says. "Despite all that has happened, despite the supposed Talibanization of the mind, the resistance strands have also been there and unlike in the past, there’s a more concerted attempt now — not least because of the negative profiling of Pakistan globally — that Pakistanis want to be noticed on the scene. They want to make an impact. That’s the spirit with which the Lahore Literary Festival was framed and put out for the world to see."

Images courtesy Bilal Qureshi

littlebrown:

Peep Music: A peep diorama celebrating Frog Music by Emma Donoghue.
We’ll be posting more peep dioramas this week as it gets closer to Easter. You can see them all here.

I think my favorite is all the peeps hanging out in the refrigerator reading Michael Ruhlman’s Egg

Check out our conversation with Ruhlman here.  And of course, the grand-daddy of all peep diorama events is the Washington Post's annual contest — winners will be announced this Sunday!

littlebrown:

Peep Music: A peep diorama celebrating Frog Music by Emma Donoghue.

We’ll be posting more peep dioramas this week as it gets closer to Easter. You can see them all here.

I think my favorite is all the peeps hanging out in the refrigerator reading Michael Ruhlman’s Egg

Check out our conversation with Ruhlman here.  And of course, the grand-daddy of all peep diorama events is the Washington Post's annual contest — winners will be announced this Sunday!

(via arlingtonvalib)