Image via Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for USC Shoah Foundation
Today in Book News: Bruce Springsteen is writing a children’s book about a bank-robbing baby called Outlaw Pete, based on his song of the same name. “Outlaw Pete is essentially the story of a man trying to outlive and outrun his sins,” Springsteen said in a statement. The song “Outlaw Pete” was inspired by the 1950 children’s book Brave Cowboy Bill. 
Also today, Quyen Nguyenhas an interview with Tobias Wolff in the Boston Review. Asked about the relationship between literature and politics, Wolff said: “I think it is a political act to force someone to enter the mind, the spirit, the perspective of another human being.”
And the DC Public Library has hired a social worker to help homeless patrons. Social worker Jean Badalamenti told thePost, "Because the libraries tend to be gathering places for people without homes, it’s important to be part of the citywide conversation about how we’re going to address homelessness, health services and moving people out of homelessness."
Read more here.

Image via Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for USC Shoah Foundation

Today in Book NewsBruce Springsteen is writing a children’s book about a bank-robbing baby called Outlaw Pete, based on his song of the same name. “Outlaw Pete is essentially the story of a man trying to outlive and outrun his sins,” Springsteen said in a statement. The song “Outlaw Pete” was inspired by the 1950 children’s book Brave Cowboy Bill

Also today, Quyen Nguyenhas an interview with Tobias Wolff in the Boston Review. Asked about the relationship between literature and politics, Wolff said: “I think it is a political act to force someone to enter the mind, the spirit, the perspective of another human being.”

And the DC Public Library has hired a social worker to help homeless patrons. Social worker Jean Badalamenti told thePost, "Because the libraries tend to be gathering places for people without homes, it’s important to be part of the citywide conversation about how we’re going to address homelessness, health services and moving people out of homelessness."

Read more here.

Day OFFICIALLY made: tor.com has republished an Imperial Radch story by Ann Leckie, called “Night’s Slow Poison.” If you can’t wait for Ancillary Sword to come out, here’s a chance to dip your toes back into her amazing world.  
From tor.com: “Night’s Slow Poison” is from the same setting as Ancillary Justice, and tells a rich, claustrophobic story of a galactic voyage that forces one guardsmen to confront his uneasy family history through the lens of a passenger with his lost lover’s eyes.

The Jewel of Athat was mainly a cargo ship, and most spaces were narrow and cramped. Like the Outer Station, where it was docked, it was austere, its decks and bulkheads scuffed and dingy with age. Inarakhat Kels, armed, and properly masked, had already turned away one passenger, and now he stood in the passageway that led from the station to the ship, awaiting the next…

Read the rest here.
— Petra

Day OFFICIALLY made: tor.com has republished an Imperial Radch story by Ann Leckie, called “Night’s Slow Poison.” If you can’t wait for Ancillary Sword to come out, here’s a chance to dip your toes back into her amazing world.  

From tor.com: “Night’s Slow Poison” is from the same setting as Ancillary Justice, and tells a rich, claustrophobic story of a galactic voyage that forces one guardsmen to confront his uneasy family history through the lens of a passenger with his lost lover’s eyes.

The Jewel of Athat was mainly a cargo ship, and most spaces were narrow and cramped. Like the Outer Station, where it was docked, it was austere, its decks and bulkheads scuffed and dingy with age. Inarakhat Kels, armed, and properly masked, had already turned away one passenger, and now he stood in the passageway that led from the station to the ship, awaiting the next…

Read the rest here.

— Petra

“What interests me about fiction is, in part, its flickering edge between realism and where a tear in the fabric of a story lets in some other sort of light.”

Ben Lerner

Today in Book News, Ben Lerner talks to our buddy Parul Sehgal about writing fiction, former Poet Laureate Robert Haas wins the $100,000 Wallace Stevens prize for “outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry” from the Academy of American Poets, and a new study finds that female journalists get disproportionate amounts of abuse online.

Read more here.

“Perhaps you have just ended a blistering affair. Perhaps you have just discovered your significant other’s blistering affair. Perhaps you are contemplating embarking on one – or ejecting from one. These three books will help.”

Randon Billings Noble, Three Books to Get Over an Affair” (via millionsmillions)

Pairs nicely with this list (circa 2009, so kind of funky looking) of three books about illicit love.

— Nicole

Image via Getty
Today in Book News: California history textbooks will now be asked to cover “the significance of President Barack Obama’s election,” under a law signed this week by Gov. Jerry Brown. The new law requires California’s Instructional Quality Commission “to consider including, and recommending for adoption by the state board, instruction on the election of President Barack Obama and the significance of the United States electing its first African American President, as appropriate.” The author, Democratic Assemblyman Chris Holden, said in a statement: “We want to make sure that future generations understand that the election of our nation’s first African American president was a historic step in the effort towards equality and that previous elections involved intimidation and violence that prevented millions of African Americans from voting.”
Read more here.

Image via Getty

Today in Book NewsCalifornia history textbooks will now be asked to cover “the significance of President Barack Obama’s election,” under a law signed this week by Gov. Jerry Brown. The new law requires California’s Instructional Quality Commission “to consider including, and recommending for adoption by the state board, instruction on the election of President Barack Obama and the significance of the United States electing its first African American President, as appropriate.” The author, Democratic Assemblyman Chris Holden, said in a statement: “We want to make sure that future generations understand that the election of our nation’s first African American president was a historic step in the effort towards equality and that previous elections involved intimidation and violence that prevented millions of African Americans from voting.”

Read more here.

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…

In nonfiction …

Image via independent.ie
Today in Book News: The nomadic Irish poet Desmond O’Grady, who had a bit part in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, has died, The Irish Times reports. O’Grady lived much of his life abroad, in Paris, Italy (where he met Fellini), the U.S. and Egypt. He told an interviewer: “James Joyce left. So I too had to.”
Also today: Kathryn Schulz profiles David Mitchell in New York Magazine: "You could call Mitchell a global writer, I suppose, but that does not quite capture what he is doing. It is closer to say that he is a pangaeic writer, a supercontinental writer. What is for geologists a physical fact — that the world is everywhere interconnected, bound together in a cycle of faulting and folding, rifting and drifting, erosion and uplift — is, for Mitchell, a metaphysical conviction." (See also: NPR’s excerpt of his forthcoming book)
And Jessamyn West defends the most maligned font — Comic Sans.
Read more here.

Image via independent.ie

Today in Book NewsThe nomadic Irish poet Desmond O’Grady, who had a bit part in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, has died, The Irish Times reports. O’Grady lived much of his life abroad, in Paris, Italy (where he met Fellini), the U.S. and Egypt. He told an interviewer: “James Joyce left. So I too had to.”

Also today: Kathryn Schulz profiles David Mitchell in New York Magazine: "You could call Mitchell a global writer, I suppose, but that does not quite capture what he is doing. It is closer to say that he is a pangaeic writer, a supercontinental writer. What is for geologists a physical fact — that the world is everywhere interconnected, bound together in a cycle of faulting and folding, rifting and drifting, erosion and uplift — is, for Mitchell, a metaphysical conviction." (See also: NPR’s excerpt of his forthcoming book)

And Jessamyn West defends the most maligned font — Comic Sans.

Read more here.

YOU GUYS, we have such a treat for you today — an exclusive First Read of David Mitchell’s new novel, The Bone Clocks

It’s a decades-spanning saga that switches perspective from section to section among a wildly disparate group of people — but the center of it all is Holly Sykes, at the start of the book a psychically sensitive runaway who gets caught up in a war between two factions of ancient near-immortals. 

Read it here!